“Globally Competent Individuals & Leaders”

From the archives.  I found this blog post in my drafts and, although from a couple of years ago, the theme of global competencies continues to grow in importance in the development of young people.

Arne Duncan’s special message to NAFSA, the Association of International Educators, providing support for the work that is done to promote global learning that develops the skills and competencies to play an effective role in our rapidly changing world.

A global education is part of everything we do in schools.  The interconnectedness of the world is such that we have now more effectively moved beyond the boundaries of the classroom in the development of values that will enable our children, and ourselves, to live more carefully and more curiously now and in the future.

Towards a global literacy.

It is a journey and, if it hasn’t already (which it probably has if you think about it), I suggest 3 simple steps that can be taken to further develop understanding of the world beyond our borders.  This is a global literacy.  Equipping our young people (and ourselves) with the language, knowledge and understanding to reach out and make the most of the world in which we live.

  • Scratch the surface.  Even in leafy Hertfordshire, a class discussion on family trees or around traditions – particularly interesting at Christmas, Easter or Diwali – will often quickly uncover relatives who were born overseas.  Naturally, care needs to be taken over children’s stories, yet carefully handled, family history, traditions and culture can help children recognise the diversity that exists amongst themselves.
  • Fly the flag.  A flagpole is great, but any public display space can carry a regularly rotating image or a flag.  Whether, linked to a school’s own international projects or simply for developing general knowledge, a flag makes a fantastic talking point – see Roman Mars on TED.com for example.  You will also know what vexillology means!
  • Use the enthusiasm of others.  Not only within your own staff team, but also connect with what teachers are willing to do in other locations.  Making links through the British Council Connecting Classrooms initiative very quickly, in my experience, returns contacts from schools in other countries.  The enthusiasm and sheer will that I have discovered in school teachers and leaders is humbling.  With just a little organisation, some ICT, photos and letters children can come face-to-face with each other in very different locations.  In addition, I have found that just by starting this process, the interest of colleagues in travel has emerged, voluntarily, to support the physical connections that make linking schools so much more effective.

As a start (or rather, the continued promotion of global education) these are just a few of many simple things that can kick start discussion and development at school.  Once these conversations start, whether they are in the classroom or between colleagues, the motivation and momentum will increase.  And you will probably find yourself nominated global learning coordinator.  Now wouldn’t that be a good thing!

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